[E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial

Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner

Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Free read ↠ The Fiery Trial ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF From a master historian the story of Lincoln's and the nation's transformation through the crucible of slavery and emancipation Winner of the Pulitzer Prize the Bancroft Prize and the Lincoln PrizeIn this landmark work of deep scholarship and insight Eric Foner gives us the definitive history of Lincoln and the end of slavery in America Foner begins with Lincoln's youth in Indiana and Illinois and follows the trajectory of his career across an increasingly tense and shifting political terrain from Illinois to Washington DC Although “naturally anti slavery” for as long as he. This is a Pulitzer Prize winning book specifically about Abraham Lincoln and his evolution about slavery and racism This is an extensive almost comprehensive analysis of these matters It would serve as a text for an upper level course on such topics It is written with a master historian s balance and objectivity revealing about Lincoln than I had realized after reading uite a bit about him He comes through as a real person real politician and not the saint of whom he is popularly portrayed Given current events it gave me goose bumps to read some of what is recorded in this book We are still living struggling suffering with the issues which resulted in the horrors of the civil war and all of the injustice which has transpired since It is very sad and discouraging that ignorance hate and injustice persist so dreadfully

Free download The Fiery TrialThe Fiery Trial

Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Free read ↠ The Fiery Trial ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Ident of a divided nation and commander in chief at war displaying a similar compound of pragmatism and principle Lincoln finally embraces what he calls the Civil War's “fundamental and astounding” result the immediate uncompensated abolition of slavery and recognition of blacks as American citizensFoner's Lincoln emerges as a leader one whose greatness lies in his capacity for moral and political growth through real engagement with allies and critics alike This powerful work will transform our understanding of the nation's greatest president and the issue that mattered mos. When you ve read 20 Lincoln biographies one has to ask why read another but this book actually has a unifying principle different from the rest Foner looks only at Lincoln s statements and evolving beliefs about slavery While I ve read many of the primary documents before it is nice to have these particular ones gathered together so you can see the development of Lincoln s abolitionism but than that his understanding of African Americans as citizens of this nation who deserved not only NOT to be resettled in another country but their political rights Foner recounts that Lincoln actually had very little contact with black slaves or freemen before his presidency It was as much a result of his conversations with black churchmen teachers abolitionists and those former slaves who enlisted in the Union army than any change in his political thought that Lincoln grew in his understanding of African Americans as full and eual citizens

Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner

Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Free read ↠ The Fiery Trial ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Can remember Lincoln scrupulously holds to the position that the Constitution protects the institution in the original slave states But the political landscape is transformed in 1854 when the Kansas Nebraska Act makes the expansion of slavery a national issueA man of considered words and deliberate actions Lincoln navigates the dynamic politics deftly taking measured steps often along a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party Lincoln rises to leadership in the new Republican Party by calibrating his politics to the broadest possible antislavery coalition As pres. Antebellum America has a certain dystopian fascination Colorblind civic nationality and a multiracial citizenry weren t unfulfilled promises they weren t even promised With his characteristic command of the era s ideological texture Foner transports readers of The Fiery Trial back to the 1850s where some senators think the Declaration of Independence a subversive document The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court declares that blacks have no rights a white man is bound to respect Northerners dislike blacks as much as they dislike slavery in fact associate master and slave in an undiscriminating abhorrence Outside of New England the free states bar blacks from voting from testifying in court from attending public school from entering the professions Illinois and Indiana earnestly though ineffectually prohibit black settlement The unowned the masterless black is an anathema nationwide In the conclaves and conventions of the emerging antislavery party the Republicans it s nigger this and nigger that amid excited planning of the post emancipation deportations Only the most radical abolitionists advocate black citizenship and in response most laugh and ask them But would you let your daughter marry one A formula fallen into disuse only recently And the future Emancipator is no lodestar beams faint hope to twenty first century citizen He seems a mere politician of the White Republic a man of his time a man of minor conscienceLincoln s thought in the late 1850s seemed suspended between a civic conception of American nationality based on the universal principle of euality and thus open to immigrants with no historic roots in this country and in principle to blacks and a racial nationalism that saw blacks as in some ways not truly American He found it impossible to imagine the United States as a biracial society When he spoke of returning blacks to Africa their own native land Lincoln revealed that he did not consider them an intrinsic part of American societyBut the twenty first century citizen does not matter Not at all I intrude from an America yet unborn For Lincoln and his colleagues the pressing issues are the infant party s unity and electoral success its consolidation of antislavery sentiment into a political movement capable of blocking the national expansion of slaveholding and contesting with the southern planters for the rod of empire Du Bois florid as usual To unite and advance his party savvy Lincoln sought the lowest common denominator of antislavery opinion In 1860 the lowest common denominator was opposition to slavery in the Western territories and disgust at the Supreme Court s perceived attack in the Dred Scott ruling on northern states bans on slaveholding within their borders Against these the bumpkin Negrophobe and radical Bostonian could unite Lincoln owed his nomination in 1860 to his appeal to both wings and almost everyone between He was the second choice of all factions Conservatives and moderates said Amen when he emphasized blocking expansion and pledged non interference with slavery where it already existed most believed that to confine slavery to the south was to put it on the road to extinction avoiding talk of civil rights and frankly scoffing at social euality while the radicals liked that he condemned slavery morally as a human wrong in a style he would further refine into the graven consecratory elouence we used to memorize in school Our republican robe is soiled and trailed in the dust Let us repurify it Let us turn and wash it white in the spirit if not the blood of the Revolution Let us turn slavery from its claims of moral right back upon its existing legal rights and its arguments of necessity Let us return it to the position our fathers gave it and there let it rest in peace Let us re adopt the Declaration of Independence and with it the practices and policy which harmonize with it Let north and south let all Americans let all lovers of liberty everywhere join in the great and good work If we do this we shall not only have saved the Union but we shall have so saved it as to make and to keep it forever worthy of the saving Speech at Peoria Ill 1854With Lincoln s election and secession and war the middle ground became much harder to occupy The lowest common denominator of antislavery opinion was becoming radical though in fits and starts and on sometimes unknowable levels Lincoln said that far from controlling events events controlled him A very suggestive evocation of the conflict s first 15 months War was weakening slavery and slaves escaped to encroaching Union lines to what one Virginia runaway called the Lincoln Army but the administration had no coherent slavery policy pursued euivocal and often conflicting measures Foner shows Lincoln at times far ahead of public opinion coaxing it cleverly at times merely marching in step with or even hastening to catch up to the Congress and the northern public in their tortuous debates and shifts of mind at the end of which lay the realization that since slavery caused the rebellion supported the rebellion was in fact the Confederacy s raison d tat then slavery must be destroyed Lincoln spoke of resorting to the Emancipation lever when he saw the Confederates determined to resist when he saw that a short limited war of chastening and restoration had become a fight to the finish a conuest a revolutionary remaking a crusade to break the Slave Power that had dominated the nation and now peevishly sought its dissolution with black soldiers thus black citizens to help in the breaking The Great Emancipator is a creature an offshoot of the hardcore nationalist ready to throw down in a total war using all indispensable means Better than any other speech or writing Foner uotes Lincoln s 1864 letter to a Kentucky editor reveals this mixed ambiguous humanitarian warlord who like his impassive enforcer Grant observed a distinction between his public duty to the nation and his private dislike of slavery and who became a crusader of immediate abolition only when slavery threatened the nation outright when in Whitman s words secession slavery the archenemy personifiedunmistakably show d his face I am naturally anti slavery If slavery is not wrong nothing is wrong I can not remember when I did not so think and feel And yet I have never understood that the Presidency conferred upon me an unrestricted right to act officially upon this judgment and feeling It was in the oath I took that I would to the best of my ability preserve protect and defend the Constitution of the United States I could not take the office without taking the oath Nor was it my view that I might take an oath to get power and break the oath in using the power I understood too that in ordinary civil administration this oath even forbade me to practically indulge my primary abstract judgment on the moral uestion of slaveryI did understand however that my oath to preserve the constitution to the best of my ability imposed upon me the duty of preserving by every indispensable means that government that nation of which that constitution was the organic law Was it possible to lose the nation and yet preserve the constitution I felt that measures otherwise unconstitutional might become lawful by becoming indispensable to the preservation of the constitution through the preservation of the nation Right or wrong I assumed this ground and now avow itWhen in March and May and July 1862 I made earnest and successive appeals to the border states to favor compensated emancipation I believed the indispensable necessity for military emancipation and arming the blacks would come unless averted by that measure They declined the proposition and I was in my best judgment driven to the alternative of either surrendering the Union and with it the Constitution or of laying strong hand upon the colored element I chose the latter In choosing it I hoped for greater gain than loss but of this I was not entirely confident More than a year of trial now shows no loss by it in our foreign relations none in our home popular sentiment none in our white military force no loss by it any how or any where On the contrary it shows a gain of uite a hundred and thirty thousand soldiers seamen and laborers These are palpable facts about which as facts there can be no cavilling We have the men and we could not have had them without the measureSo by 1863 the mysterious middle of northern opinion supported the war aim of emancipation and warily accepted after the stout showing of the 54th Massachusetts grudgingly admired black troops But unity around emancipation and unconditional surrender did not end the wrangling and controversy Postwar reconstruction loomed In the words of Lincoln s postmaster general they had yet to tackle the negro uestion as contradistinguished from the slave uestion Conservatives opposed black suffrage or at least wanted eligibility left up to the states which amounted to the same thing Radicals thought freedom worthless without suffrage and wanted it Federally guaranteed And Lincoln was again in his place as mediator Even as he mulled emancipation Lincoln had found it hard to imagine a black citizenship He had clung to the hope that if freed blacks would submit to colonization in Haiti or a tract of Colombia his agents had scouted As late as a month before issuing the Emancipation Proclamation he told a delegation of free blacks that there is an unwillingness on the part of our people harsh as it may be for you free colored people to remain with usI do not propose to discuss this but to propose it as a fact with which we have to dealIt is better therefore to be separatedJames M McPherson calls this meeting the lowest point of Lincoln s presidency Certainly President Lincoln is never farther from contemporary norms But I m not surprised or disgusted that Lincoln couldn t uite imagine blacks in the political nation culturally and sexually the nation was nothing if not amalgamated The shrewdest of politicians and a depressive writerly type he cast a cold eye in appraisal He knew his people And he knew himself as a Whig operative in the 1830s he had helped smear Democratic candidates as pro black He must have suspected how long whites would resist must have feared how divisive and disruptive anti black wedge issues as we call them would be to the politics of the patched up Union If he had had a crystal ball would he have been surprised by one of his party s lowest points when in 1980 Ronald Reagan told a crowd in Philadelphia Mississippi where Schwerner Chaney and Goodman were murdered sixteen years earlier I believe in states rights Would he have been shocked that open negrophobia was in time subtilized into dog whistles like welfare ueens I doubt it Lincoln never publicly mentioned colonization after the Proclamation took effect He understood that the blacks who joined the fight did so for freedom in their homeland not freedom followed by banishmentThere are getting to be many black troops There is one very good regiment here as black as tar they go around have the regular uniform they submit to no nonsense Others are constantly forming It is getting to be a common sight Whitman letter to his mother 30 June 1863 At this historical juncture it was of immense importance that Lincoln was an unbigoted morally impressionable man His appreciation of the nation saving contribution of black troops helped him imagine their citizenship despite his continuing melancholic dwelling through 1863 on the viciousness of white racism of the Draft Riots he sighed privately It would be far better to separate the races than to have such scenes as those in New York the other day where negroes were hanged to lampposts Of eual importance Foner argues were his meetings with black leaders Frederick Douglass and the Episcopal pastor Alexander Crummell later a mentor to Du Bois among others disclosed to Lincoln an educated politically prominent class whose formation American law and custom had done much to discourage and of which he like most whites was ignorant or incredulous Massed behind Douglass a self taught low born orator like himself to Grant he would later describe Douglass as one of the most meritorious men in America Lincoln saw patriots eager for a country citizens hungry to join the political nation Douglass was for his part impressed by Lincoln s entire freedom from popular prejudice against the colored race by his willingness to receive an ex slave just as you have seen one gentleman receive another In his view Lincoln was one of the very few Americans who could entertain a Negro and converse with him without in anywise reminding him of the unpopularity of his color Lincoln delivered his so called last speech on April 11 1865 from the balcony of the White House Addressing Reconstruction he acknowledged black claims to political rights and announced his support for limited suffrage veterans and an unspecified elect he called the very intelligent The speech struck even moderates as tepid and waffling but one member of the audience John Wilkes Booth got the message That means nigger citizenship he fumed Foner s strength is his reanimation of the era s debates its political communication He is not a dramatic historian He is indifferent to the literary climaxes Lincoln s presidency suggests He never mentions Lincoln and Grant s June 1864 visit to Hinks black division in the Petersburg lines After the review soldiers broke ranks and mobbed the president stroking his horse kissing his hands a scene that left Lincoln choked up and speechless And Foner passes uickly over Lincoln s entrance into fallen Richmond The late rebel capital s black population thronged the streets forming a jubilation of shouting and praying around the president and his small bodyguard of Marines as they walked to the Confederate White House where Lincoln showing the same the homely flair as Grant sat at the desk of the fugitive Davis and coolly drank a glass of water leaving it to the flamboyantly tacky General and Mrs Custer to spend the night in Davis bed That day a freedwoman of Richmond was heard to shout I know I am free for I have seen Father Abraham and felt him Another cried He s been in my heart four long years Come to free his children from bondage Frederick Douglass expressly repudiated this paternity at the 1876 dedication of an emancipation monument in Washington DC He told the mostly white crowd you are the children of Abraham Lincoln We are at best only his step children The jubilant hyperbole of the newly freed is beautiful but Douglass is right Or at least he offers a vista for the imagination as Santayana would say whose irony and ambiguity I find compelling even than the poetic resonances Father Abraham the ex slaves summoned from their one book In Douglass vista Lincoln is a politician of the White Republic before he is a straightforward savior an embattled president pragmatic and deal making before he belongs to the ages A transition a gateway a mediator between what was before the war and what came after between the nation he was from and the nation he promised


10 thoughts on “[E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial

  1. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Free download The Fiery Trial

    Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download This book is a study of American slavery and the political events that shaped Lincoln's attitude toward it Conventional wisdom would indicate that Abraham Lincoln known as the Great Emancipator would also be an advocate of eual rights and racial integration It turns out that the historical reality is a bit complicated than that The journey from the antebellum years through the Civil War and into the Reconstruc

  2. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial

    Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial This is a Pulitzer Prize winning book specifically about Abraham Lincoln and his evolution about slavery and rac

  3. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download

    Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Free download The Fiery Trial After reading Ron Chernow's Grant Doris Goodwin's Team of Rivals The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln and David Herbert Donald's Lincoln Foner's book about Lincoln and slavery The Fiery Trial Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery was a little disappointing I did appreciate the details in how Lincoln's thoughts on slavery changed over time and some of the dynamics behind the scenes during his administration but found th

  4. says: Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Free download The Fiery Trial

    [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Antebellum America has a certain dystopian fascination Colorblind civic nationality and a multiracial citizenry weren’t unfulfilled promises—they weren’t even promised With his characteristic command of the era’s ideological texture Foner transports readers of The Fiery Trial back to the 1850s where some senators think the Declarati

  5. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial

    [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial I love Foner and this book did not disappoint It is not another biography of Lincoln but a story about his changing views on slavery It's so well written and so informative I've read a lot of reconstruction narratives and

  6. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial

    [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Title pretty much explains it all It was a very well done book and I learned a lotETA I wrote this review when I was in Mexico speakin

  7. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Free download The Fiery Trial

    [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Free download The Fiery Trial “The Fiery Trial” historian Eric Foner’s Pulitzer Prize winning biography of Abraham Lincoln is a lucid well written exploration of a man compelled by circumstances and his own natural inclinations to grow In exploring Lincoln Foner ado

  8. says: Free download The Fiery Trial [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download

    [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download When you've read 20 Lincoln biographies one has to ask why read another but this book actually has a unifying principle different from

  9. says: [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Free download The Fiery Trial

    Free download The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Much like before starting and loving Garry Wills's Lincoln at Gettysburg I stated before that I had permanently sworn off all future Lincoln books Yet once again I couldn't resist and again I was than pleasantly surprised

  10. says: Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial

    Download ê eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ¿ Eric Foner [E–pub/E–book] The Fiery Trial Eric Foner ¿ 8 Free download I'm not a big Eric Foner fan The last book I read by him I struggled to finish This book was a different story I really enjoyed itOne of the problems that I have with most biographies of Lincoln is that they start with the affect o

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  • Hardcover
  • 448
  • The Fiery Trial
  • Eric Foner
  • English
  • 06 May 2018
  • 9780393066180